Tag Archives: mysqld

Understanding SHOW VARIABLES: DISABLED and NO values

When you use SHOW VARIABLES LIKE “have_%” to see whether a particular feature is enabled, you will note the value of NO for some, and DISABLED for others. These values are not intrinsically clear for the casual onlooker, and often cause confusion. Typically, this happens with SSL and InnoDB. So, here is a quick clarification!

  • NO means that the feature was not enabled (or was actively disabled) in the build. This means the code and any required libraries are not present in the binary.
  • DISABLED means that the feature is built in and capable of working in the binary, but is disabled due to relevant my.cnf settings.
  • YES means the feature is available, and configured in my.cnf.

SSL tends to show up as DISABLED, until you configure the appropriate settings to use it in my.cnf (SHOW VARIABLES LIKE “ssl_%”). From then on it will show up as YES.

Depending on your MySQL version and distro build, InnoDB can be disabled via the “skip-innodb” option. Obviously that’s not recommended as InnoDB should generally be your primary engine of choice!

However, InnoDB can also show up as DISABLED if the plugin fails to load due to configuration or other errors on startup. When this happens, review the error log (often redirected to syslog/messages) to identify the problem.

If InnoDB is configured as the default storage engine, failed initialisation of the plugin should now result in mysqld not starting, rather than starting with InnoDB disabled, as obviously InnoDB is required in that case.

Tool of the day: inotify

I was actually exploring inotify-tools for something else, but they can also be handy for seeing what goes on below a mysqld process. inotify hooks into the filesystem handlers, and sees which files are accessed. You can then set triggers, or just display a tally over a certain period.

It has been a standard Linux kernel module since 2.6.13 (2005, wow that’s a long time ago already) and can be used through calls or the inotify-tools (commandline). So with the instrumentation already in the kernel, apt-get install inotify-tools is all you need to get started.

 # inotifywatch -v -t 20 -r /var/lib/mysql/* /var/lib/mysql/zabbix/*
Establishing watches...
Setting up watch(es) on /var/lib/mysql/mysql/user.frm
OK, /var/lib/mysql/mysql/user.frm is now being watched.
[...]
Total of 212 watches.
Finished establishing watches, now collecting statistics.
Will listen for events for 60 seconds.
total  modify  filename
2371   2371    /var/lib/mysql/relay-log.info
2148   2148    /var/lib/mysql/master.info
1157   1157    /var/lib/mysql/ib_logfile0
24     24      /var/lib/mysql/zabbix/
24     24      /var/lib/mysql/zabbix/history.ibd
8      8       /var/lib/mysql/zabbix/trends_uint.ibd
6      6       /var/lib/mysql/zabbix/items.ibd
5      5       /var/lib/mysql/ibdata1

This is just a limited example from a dev box, but you can see the benefit. You can see which files have been accessed, in what way, and how many times over the specified period. Consequently this provides the most insight if you’re using innodb-file-per-table (or MyISAM) rather than a single InnoDB tablespace. But of course it depends a bit on what you’re looking for.