MariaDB Foundation

You may have already seen the announcement MariaDB Foundation to Safeguard Leading Open Source Database. We at Open Query wholeheartedly support this (r)evolution of the MySQL ecosystem, which appears to be increasingly necessary as Oracle Corp is seriously dropping the ball with security updates and actually just general development and innovation. Oracle has actually done some […]

MariaDB security updates

Important Security Fix for a Buffer Overflow Bug: MariaDB 5.5.28a, 5.3.11, 5.2.13 and 5.1.66 include a fix for CVE-2012-5579, a vulnerability that allowed an authenticated user to crash MariaDB server or to execute arbitrary code with the privileges of the mysqld process. This is a serious security issue. We recommend upgrading from older versions as […]

MariaDB C client libraries and the end of dual-licensing

Finally there is an LGPL C client library for MariaDB, and thus also for MySQL. Monty Program and SkySQL have been working on this for some time. Admittedly there was already the BSD licensed Drizzle client library which was also able to talk to a MySQL/MariaDB server, however its API is different. The C client […]

Serving Clients Rather than Falling Over

Dawnstar Australis (yes, nickname – but I know him personally – he speaks with knowledge and authority) updates on The Real Victims Of The Click Frenzy Fail: The Australian Consumer after his earlier post from a few months ago. Colourful language aside, I believe he rightfully points out the failings of the organising company and the big […]

Optimising Web Servers

I was lucky enough to attend PyCon-AU recently and one talk in particular highlighted the process of web server optimisation. Graham Dumpleton’s add-in talk Web Server Bottlenecks And Performance Tuning available on YouTube (with the majority of PyCon-AU talks) The first big note at the beginning is that the majority of the delay in user’s perception of a […]

The Optimiser Conundrum

We’ve been helping a long-term client who runs some fairly complex queries (covering lots of tables and logic on a respectably big but mainly volatile dataset). We tend to look first at query structure and table design, as fixing problems there tends to have the most impact. This contrary to just tossing more hardware at […]

The Data Charmer: Is Oracle really killing MySQL?

http://datacharmer.blogspot.it/2012/08/is-oracle-really-killing-mysql.html An insightful post for my former  (MySQL AB) colleague Giuseppe Maxia about how Oracle’s actions affect the MySQL landscape. My own comment exploring why it’s happening (from Upstarta perspective) is on his blog post rather than here. From Open Query’s business perspective, we generally deploy MariaDB unless client prefers distro stock. We get the […]

One-way Password Crypting Flaws

I was talking with a client and the topic of password crypting came up. From my background as a C coder, I have a few criteria to regard a mechanism to be safe. In this case we’ll just discuss things from the perspective of secure storage, and validation in an application. use a digital fingerprint […]

Understanding SHOW VARIABLES: DISABLED and NO values

When you use SHOW VARIABLES LIKE “have_%” to see whether a particular feature is enabled, you will note the value of NO for some, and DISABLED for others. These values are not intrinsically clear for the casual onlooker, and often cause confusion. Typically, this happens with SSL and InnoDB. So, here is a quick clarification! NO means […]

The 2012 Leap Second on Linux

Sheeri K. Cabral at the Mozilla Foundation wrote about an issue with the June 30th 2012 leap second affecting at least MySQL, Java and Minecraft servers. It now appears that the underlying cause is a Linux kernel bug, as noted by John Stultz (IBM) on the Linux Kernel mailing list, and the team Sheeri is part […]